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TURNOUT - NUMBER 296, SEPTEMBER 2001

2-6-0 EX cn # 81 (1959): Class E-10a; exx CN 903 (1951), nee GTR 1001 (1923), Class E12 located in Palmerston, On. PHOTO: John Sidney Bowles

Refurbished GTR Station in Palmerston, On. PHOTO: John Sidney Bowles

News From the Past

VIA Rail Canada and Bombardier's L. R. C. (Light, Rapid, Comfortable) which is due to enter VIA service this fall on the Montreal-Toronto line, was displayed to the Toronto public at Union Station on Thurs., July 30 from 1330 to 2030 hours. Some 3200 people inspected the train which consisted of locomotive 6901, coaches 3309, 3308, 3306 and locomotive 6904.

On Aug. 8 and 9 at 1000 hours and 1400 hours, the train made introductory trips for CN Rail employees, from Toronto to Oshawa and return. The 1400 hour trip took 1 hour and 7 minutes for the return trip and included in that was a 12 1/2 minute stop at Oshawa. The overall opinion of the passengers on board seemed to be that it was great-airy, roomy, relatively quiet.

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Toronto Suburban Railway Overpass on Weston Rd. came tumbling down on or about July 3 by the demolition crews of the Dagmar Construction to make way for the widening of Weston Rd. south of the Hwy. 400 extension.

(Both items from The Turnout Number 93, September 1981)


This Month's Quotes

"This is the quickest way we could do something to help. It's modest, but I think it shows that we're headed in the right direction." Federal Transport Minister David Collenette in announcing that VIA and GO Transit will co-ordinate some schedules and fares in the Greater Toronto Area this fall. Globe & Mail, June 12.

"It's the end of one era and the start of another. This is a bold move; some people may consider it a radical move...but it is a bold move whose time has come." Canadian Pacific Ltd. Chairman, President and CEO David O'Brien on the last annual meeting of CP Ltd. before the conglomerate is broken up. Toronto Star, April 27.


Caledon Mountain

By Ian Wheal

Canadian Pacific trains negotiated it with minimum difficulty until 1932 when this section was abandoned(Toronto, Grey and Bruce Railway had opened this route to traffic in 1873).

Storied Caledo Mountain was almost as famous as its horseshoe ccurve. In 1824, a winter gold rush left Brampton for Caledon Mountain. Hundreds of prospectors found no gold.

In 1837, the rebel, William Lyon MacKenzie received shelter in a Caledon Mountain cave on his flight to the United States. Deep crevasses and caves dot the Caledon Mountain landscape. Stories abound of lost of lost villages, caches of gold and buried treasure on the mountain.

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